How’s Your Social Media Image?

While at a social media site a few days ago, I noticed a post by a well-known worship songwriter. In it, he used profanity. It disappointed me at the time. I marveled at the disconnect between writing songs which glorify the Lord and using language which was so far from how Jesus would speak.

This is not by any means the first time I have seen such language coming from people in ministry. It seems to go on quite a bit, in fact. Maybe in some circles it is considered “hip.” However, I doubt if it is hip in the Lord’s eyes.

I wonder how many of us realize that we are constantly exposing the true condition of our hearts via social media. The things we personally say, “like,” and repost there clearly reveal to everyone the depth of our intimacy with Jesus.

Do we ever stop to consider who might be scrutinizing our witness of Him? Are we perhaps causing other believers to stumble through what they see us promoting? Does it make someone think, “It must be OK, if he’s doing it”? (Or maybe they just struggle with judging us, based on what they see.) How about the nonbelievers’ reaction? Do they say to themselves, “I see that Christians are no different than the rest of us. Why should I even consider becoming one?” Who are we, in our thoughtlessness,  disappointing or grieving?

The apostle Paul spoke on these matters two thousand years ago. He said, “Now then, we are ambassadors for Christ” (2 Corinthians 5:20). Ambassadors act and speak on behalf of the higher authority who sent them. When we don’t do well at accurately representing our Savior, we hurt His cause, even to the point of driving others away from Him.

The Bible gives us guidelines for how believers are to speak:

Do not let any corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth. Instead, speak what is good, for the purpose of building up, so that it may minister grace to those who hear it. — Ephesians 4:29

Let there be no filthiness nor foolish talk nor crude joking, which are out of place, but instead let there be thanksgiving. — Ephesians 5:4 (ESV)

If anyone speaks, he should do it as one who speaks the very words of God, … that God in all things may be glorified through Jesus Christ …. — 1 Peter 4:11

My purpose is not to suggest that we all point the finger at those who use vulgar language or do anything else inconsistent with Christ. Rather, it is about each of us taking an honest look at our own heart. May we not fall into the trap of smugly accusing our brothers and sisters. Romans 14:4 warns against that: “Who are you to judge another man’s servant? To his own master he stands or falls. Yes, he shall be held up, for God is able to make him stand.” With those we know well, perhaps the answer is to talk with them about how their speech affects us. For the rest, we can always pray for them when we see something amiss. Prayer changes people; judging them does not.

When I come before the Lord in the day described in 1 Corinthians 3:12-15, I want to have as little wood, hay, and stubble showing up as possible. I have no desire to provide the materials for the mother of all bonfires! I want to have my actions, words, and thoughts increasingly line up with what Jesus would do, say, and think. The route to doing that is keeping close to Him through prayer and the Word, so that I become more and more like my best Friend.

We have been promised a future “inheritance incorruptible and undefiled, which will not fade away, reserved in heaven for you” (1 Peter 1:4). Speaking of that day when Jesus appears for His own, 1 John 3:3 sums up how we should conduct ourselves in the meantime: “And every man who has this hope in Him purifies himself, even as He is pure.”

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Lord Jesus, may we endeavor to be the best ambassadors for You that we can be. Help us to guard our words and actions carefully, so that we might elevate all those who observe us into a higher attraction toward You.

River Life: Entering into the Character of Jesus

If You Subscribed and Did Not Get Your Free E-Book

If you have subscribed to Out of the Fire, but have not received your free PDF copy of Overcoming Spiritual Bondage, I am so sorry.

When people who already have a blog account with WordPress subscribe, unfortunately, WordPress does not send me your e-mail address. They send me your user name and a link to your blog instead. And if I cannot find a way to contact you or a way to reach you through a comment at your blog, there is no way for me to send you the book.

If you have already subscribed to Out of the Fire and never received your free book from me, please contact me at leeann@leeannrubsam.com with your WordPress user name. I will be happy to send your PDF to you.

For those of you who are reading this and didn’t know about the free book offer, you will find the subscribe option in the right-side column of this blog. Sign up to receive the blog via e-mail, and I’ll send you the book.

Thank you! ~ Lee Ann

 

Going Low

One of my favorite quotes by famous people is from John the Baptist: “He must increase, but I must decrease” (John 3:30). I think on it often.

Our natural human tendency is to grab as much recognition for ourselves as possible. Those of us who have a business or ministry are constantly being told how important it is to “brand” ourselves, so that everyone knows who we are and desires our services or products. While some of that may be necessary in a practical, functional sense, the whole “Look at me! See how special I am!” egotism that often goes with it is something that we who are believers must continually resist. Our focus should always be to point people to Jesus, rather than ourselves. John the Baptist understood this, and I am so glad that his response to the temptation to strive for personal honor is recorded for us in the Bible.

There is a special place in our relationship with Jesus, where we develop such an adoration for Him that we actually desire to “go low” — where we want to empty ourselves of the desire for personal recognition, to become nothing, so that He might be everything. To make Jesus famous in all the earth becomes our passion, our obsession, where He alone matters.

Surely this must be what is going on in Revelation 4:10, 11, where the twenty-four elders “fall down before Him Who sat on the throne, and worship Him Who lives forever and ever, and cast their crowns before the throne, saying, ‘You are worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honor and power: for You have created all things, and for Your pleasure they are and were created.'” They are totally fixated on the Lord.

I began to think a lot about “going low” a few years ago, inspired by a dream which Julie Meyer shared of seeing God’s throne room. I hope you will listen to her description and that it will stir your heart, as it did mine:

While we are yet in our mortal existence, I am not sure if we can continually stay in that place of going low, of being emptied of self in adoration of the Lord. I would like to stay there, but at present, it seems as though I can only visit for a time. The fallen nature includes a tendency to drift back into pride and self-exaltation, and I find that I must personally battle against that frequently. The apostle Paul said, “I die daily” (1 Corinthians 15:31), and we must learn to die daily to the old nature’s demands as well.

But my goal is to rest in that “going low” place increasingly, until it becomes more my dwelling place than a visiting place.

If you find yourself falling into the trap of looking for recognition, titles, and honor from people, how about meditating on what John the Baptist said? “He must increase, but I must decrease.” John found peace and rest there. I think we can, too.

All-Surpassing Peace in a Shaking World

inner peaceMy newest book, All-Surpassing Peace in a Shaking World, is now available!

Thank you so much to those who took advantage of our pre-order sale! If you enjoyed All-Surpassing Peace, please help us spread the word by recommending it to your friends! (Rating it at the site you purchased it from also helps, and is so appreciated.)

Book Description:

All of us long for peace: for the world, in our relationships, and most importantly, inside ourselves. Why is peace so elusive, even for those of us who are Christians? How do we manage to achieve true peace — and then hang onto it?

In All-Surpassing Peace in a Shaking World, you will discover why peace is the covenant right of every child of God, and how you can access it. I share practical keys from Scripture and my personal experience to help you enter into a greater peace than you have yet known.

Discover:

  • How to enter into a covenant of peace with God
  • How to overcome hindrances to your peace
  • Your calling to be God’s agent of peace to others
  • How peace can be a tool to guide your life
  • Ways to maintain or restore your peace in times of turmoil

Read a Sample

Available at:

Thanks for taking a look! I hope All-Surpassing Peace will be a blessing to you!

 

 

Prophetic Leaning (Part 2)

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Gerald Sargent Foster, Racing, 1934, Smithsonian American Art Museum, License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

As I said in Part One, it is often wise to wait on making prophetic revelation public, so that we’re sure we have the whole of what God wants to say through us. Revelation and its understanding tend to come in pieces.

First, we need to weigh what we have heard or seen to make sure it is really coming from the Lord, not our own imaginations, fears, or hang-ups. Once we are certain we have received something from Him, our next step should be to seek Him for the correct interpretation and application. Interpretations and applications are higher steps in making prophecy useful to the Body of Christ. We can ask the Lord questions such as:

“What specific events or situations are you speaking of? Who is this meant for?”

When I first began releasing things I was hearing, I often blundered in believing my revelation was specifically for our local church. Sometimes what I said was not received favorably, because it did not always fit with the inner witness of our leaders. What I did not understand then was, more often than not, I was hearing about the American Church at large, not specifically our local fellowship. It was only when I saw a few well-known prophets saying the same things — sometimes down to the last word in a sentence or phrase — that I realized what was really going on. What a huge relief! I was not “off” in my hearing after all. I had merely misapplied who it was for.

A still more common mistake is to apply to others a word God is speaking to us personally, and only to us. We eagerly prophesy it for the local church, thinking it’s for everyone else. This tends to happen especially when it is a corrective word which our flesh isn’t keen on hearing and applying personally. Revelation certainly can have an application beyond ourselves, but we should make sure God intends that before releasing a personal word as a one-size-fits-all prophecy.

“What is the timing — now or later?”

This can be really hard to discern, even for seasoned prophets.

Several years ago, a respected national prophet released a dream he’d had about California, which depicted a coming destructive earthquake of massive proportions. He strongly exhorted God’s people to leave California immediately. Of course, this information and the resulting advice was very upsetting to many California believers.

Meanwhile, I was personally hearing that revival and awakening were coming to California. Abundant fruit for the kingdom of God would come forth from that state. There would be a great shift in the ideology of Californians. I was also hearing to pray for an end to the severe physical drought going on there, and that the spiritual drought would also come to an end by the “rains” of the Spirit being poured out on that state.

Now, this messes with my mind extremely, to be hearing the seeming opposite of what time-tested, well-known prophets are hearing! My inclination is to think, “Lee Ann, you are just plain nuts!” But I asked the Lord about it, since I felt such an urge to pray blessings in upon California. He responded, “He [the well-known prophet] is seeing into the long-term future, while you are praying into My purposes for the shorter term.” The light bulb went on. It was not about one or the other hearing wrongly; it was about timing.

Unprecedented rains did come a few months later, and they continue to come in abundance. Currently, there are also some early signs of revival breaking out in a few places. The fullness of what God wants to pour out on California is still in its beginning stages.

“What if I continue to not understand or be certain of my revelation?”

Sometimes a word or vision will press on us, but understanding continues to elude us. We’re in good company. The prophets in the Bible often could not grasp what they were seeing, either. Some Bible prophecies are still awaiting fulfillment. This is just the way God works!

God may show us what our revelation is about at a later date, if we give it time. Or, it could be that He wants us to get the input of other trusted prophetic people. While we may have the actual word, how to interpret it may be given to someone else. Still another person may receive divine insight about how to apply it. In the New Testament body of believers, we are meant to work together, assisting each other in the ministry of spiritual gifts. We generally do not receive the whole counsel of God by ourselves. Even collectively, we are not always given the entire picture. The apostle Paul said, “For we know in part, and we prophesy in part. … For now we see through a glass darkly, but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known” (1 Corinthians 13:9, 12).

As we continue to seek the Lord, trusting Him to purify what we hear and see, we will gain clarity and keener discernment. God has chosen to make revelation and the understanding of it a process to draw us into greater dependence upon Him. Our nature conforms to His as we learn to submit our imperfect prophetic leanings into His care. It’s a beautiful journey together with Him.

Personal Prophecy

 

The Spirit-Filled Guide to Personal Prophecy

 

 

 

Prophetic Leaning (Part 1)

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Gerald Sargent Foster, Racing, 1934, Smithsonian American Art Museum, License: CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Recently, the Lord spoke to me, “Lean not on the imaginations of your own heart.” It was a  restating of Proverbs 3:5, “… Lean not on your own understanding.” This was a word for me personally concerning a specific situation, but I think it can also apply in a general way to any of us who hear God’s voice and/or see visions. We should take time to discern whether we are truly hearing and seeing from the Lord, or whether our own imaginations are tainting our revelation.

During the months leading up to the Presidential election, and since then, we encountered many prophetic people with conflicting assertions about what the future held and still holds:

  • President Obama would not finish his term in office. / President Obama would seize a third term for himself.
  • There would be no election. / There would be an election.
  • Hillary Clinton would win. / Donald Trump would win.
  • The election would be a squeaker. / The election would be a landslide.
  • There would be martial law, and on and on.

Obviously, some of the dreams, visions, and “the Lord told me” statements were blatantly false. They came from the imaginations of the prophetic people’s own hearts. Confusion and division within the Body of Christ resulted, as did much skepticism about prophecy in general, which is a terrible shame.

Was all of this coming from false prophets? Not necessarily. Immaturity is a possible factor. Some of the people releasing supposed revelation, especially of a sensational nature, simply succumbed to a desire for fame. The possibility of being heard by the world through YouTube and other social media platforms brings with it huge temptations for the ego.

Some, I believe, received information which was meant as a call to prayer, so that the things they were seeing could be prevented from happening. That wasn’t always clearly understood or stated.

Some, no doubt, experienced dreams or visions fed mostly by their own biases and fears, which in turn bred fear in those who listened to them. There tends to be a lot of fear-prophesying going around.

Before we are too harsh in our judgments, we need to realize that we’re all susceptible to inaccurate revelation based on our inner issues. It’s good to ask ourselves, “How can I avoid making the same kinds of mistakes?”

For most of us, when we receive a word or vision, it is wisest to sit on it for a while, letting it simmer in our hearts. The simmering helps us to discern between what is a product of our own souls and what is genuinely from the Lord. While we keep it between us and Him, we continue to inquire for a fuller understanding of what He is revealing. He often discloses what He wants to say in pieces. Many is the time in my past, when I got excited about something I was hearing from the Lord and released it too soon, only to have the Lord tell me more afterwards, which rounded out or clarified the original word. My revelation would have been far more beneficial to others if I had waited on the Lord for the fullness of it.

We should also be aware that most of what we hear is not even meant for public release. Its purpose is for prayer. While encouraging and assisting the Church through prophecy is very important, it is equally true that much of what we receive is supposed to stay a secret between God and us. It is given so that we can pray it back to Him.

In our next post, we’ll talk about a few specific areas where we can learn to navigate through imaginations to the accurate word of the Lord.

Part 2

Personal Prophecy

 

The Spirit-Filled Guide to Personal Prophecy

 

 

The Merciful Discerner

Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy. — Matthew 5:7

For those of us who are keen in discernment, there is a weakness we particularly struggle with: criticalness. Show me a person who is gifted in discernment, and I’ll show you a person prone to being critical.

Why is this the case? Criticalness is the soulish side of discernment. When God made mankind in His own image (Genesis 1:26), He made us perfect, like unto His nature. Each human being since Adam and Eve has been uniquely crafted by the Lord, with particular personality and ability strengths which reflect a small piece of Who He is. And what a wonderful variety we are, all intended to complement and balance each other.

But, due to man’s fall into sin back in the Garden of Eden, the image of God in each of us was marred. The good news for believers is, through Jesus our Redeemer, God is progressively bringing us back into His own image. Still, in the process, sometimes we exhibit the old marred nature, and thus it is with criticalness and discernment.

The difference between discernment and criticalness does not rest in what we see: it’s in what we do with it. We must learn to divide between being aware of the faults of others (which is not wrong in itself) and where our minds go with that information. A critical person tends to be frequently suspicious of the motives of others, thinking that he or she is receiving discernment from the Lord. Criticalness makes unholy assumptions and judgments, often based on one’s own faults or inner hurts.

One of the areas where criticalness often rears its head is in the realm of doctrinal beliefs. Those who are well-grounded in the Bible are the most prone to this. We may feel very solid in our understanding of certain theological points, and when we come into contact with people who have a different viewpoint, or a blind spot, we then think poorly of them, perhaps writing them off entirely.

Most of the time, what is such an important issue to us is not a core doctrine of the faith. It’s just a small piece of how we’re working out our Christian walk — but we make it into a very big deal. For instance, my husband and I have encountered a few people who had such narrow views of how healing ministry should be done that they would no longer fellowship with people who did not believe exactly as they did or who were not as strong in their faith.

The apostle Paul talked about criticalness over minor theological matters in Romans 14:1-4. He was speaking into a controversy about whether to eat meat or not, because there was a possibility it had been sacrificed to false gods before showing up in the public meat market. But the principle can be applied broadly by us today:

Accept him who is weak in the faith, but not to arguing over opinions. For one believes that he may eat all things. Another, who is weak, eats only vegetables. Let not him who eats despise him who does not eat. And he who does not eat should not judge him who eats, for God has received him. Who are you to judge another man’s servant? To his own master he stands or falls. Yes, he shall be held up: for God is able to make him stand.

Can we trust God to work maturity in our brothers and sisters, and let Him decide when and how to work on their foibles — even their beliefs which don’t line up with ours to a tee? “Yes, he shall be held up: for God is able to make him stand.”

As we mature in the things of the Spirit, we should find that our discernment is increasingly coupled with compassion, mercy, and patience. That is the heart of God evidencing in us. We must guard ourselves against pride, for Paul warned, “Knowledge puffs up, but charitable love builds up. And if any man thinks that he knows anything, he knows nothing yet as he ought to know” (1 Corinthians 8:2). He also said, “For I say, through the grace given to me, to every man who is among you, not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think…” (Romans 12:3).

We’ve all got a long journey ahead of us before we reach perfection. Let’s give each other a break.

I’ve written another article on criticalness versus discernment, which contains a list of questions to help us determine whether we are operating in discernment from the Spirit or merely criticalness of the soul. I hope you will find that post helpful.