Category Archives: prophetic intercessor

When Your Destiny Purpose Changes

Christian destinyWe talked in a previous post about God being the One Who changes times and seasons (Daniel 2:21). I sense that we are currently in such a season change. A major shift is taking place. God is going to do a new thing, and I’m praying for His understanding about what that will look like.

How do season shifts affect us personally, especially our destiny? We can rest confidently in what God has spoken to us in the past about His purposes for us. Everything He has said will eventually take place, because He is completely truthful and faithful.

However, the journey to fulfillment is rarely an “as the arrow flies” trip. It will take many twists and turns, zigs and zags, before we get there. Often, it will look as though a part of what we thought God was speaking has died. It hasn’t. God is not forgetful. While we are waiting, if we keep faithfully serving the Lord, we will fulfill other parts of His blueprint for our life — things we didn’t even realize were part of the plan.

Typically, the major purposes God has for us take time to mature. Behind the scenes, God is weaving all the threads together, quietly working while we think nothing is happening. At the right time, what we thought had died will come to life again.

When there is a lull — even a shut door — in our destiny, it’s easy to think, “I prepared. I prayed. And now it’s gone.” This is the time to do two things: rest in God’s faithfulness and actively move in what God has put to our hand in the present moment. We can be fruitful in other areas besides what God specifically spoke to us about. Look for the opportunities He has dropped right on your doorstep. These are part of His plan for you, too.

I am a prophetic person; I live in the future I have foreseen. But I have learned that we must also live in our now. The prophet Jeremiah gave instruction for the current situation to the Israelites exiled in Babylon. It is a word we would do well to heed: “Build houses and dwell in them; plant gardens and eat the fruit of them” (Jeremiah 29:5). That is part of fulfilling God’s complete plan for us — be productive where we are while we are waiting. It doesn’t negate the promise showing up a few sentences later: “For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you an expected end(v. 11). Both are rock-solid realities.

In changing times and seasons in our lives, sometimes a door closes abruptly. That doesn’t mean it is forever. The Lord will reopen it at the right moment, perhaps as abruptly as it closed, perhaps gradually swinging it open before us.

While we are waiting for the parts of His plan that we know, He has multiple other purposes for us to fulfill. Some of them will pop up as sudden surprises. He doesn’t reveal everything all in one lump. We will bear much more fruit for Him if we don’t stubbornly plop ourselves down on the fragment of the plan we do know, refusing to budge from it. Keep an open mind to new ways to serve Him, ways you had no previous inkling of.

I have an additional theory about unfulfilled destiny:

There may be aspects of God’s plan for us — things He has clearly spoken — which will find their ultimate fulfillment during the Millennial Reign of Jesus upon the earth — or even after that. We’d like it all to happen in our present life, and much of it will. But what if part of the picture waits for completion in the age to come? In the Bible, we have very little specific information available to us about what that time will look like for the glorified sons of God.

I suspect God has purposes for us which we don’t yet know of, which will span our eternal existence with Him. His predetermined plans for us are not confined to the short time we spend in our mortal bodies. 1 John 3:2 offers a hint of this: “Beloved, now we are the sons of God, and it does not yet appear what we shall be. But we know that, when He shall appear, we shall be like Him, for we shall see Him as He is.”

I hope I haven’t messed with you too badly by sharing these thoughts. They are just things I wonder about here and there. I do still expect to see fulfillment in this life of things the Lord spoke to me long ago, even though they seem dead right now. But no matter how it shakes down, we can completely trust the Lord to do for us what He has said.

Ultimately, our greatest destiny purpose is to be ardent, trusting lovers of God, who will follow Jesus wherever He leads. If we have that perspective, the rest will turn out just fine.

_______________________________________________

To celebrate National Homeschool Day (February 23), we are running a $3.00 off sale on Character Building for Families, Vol. 1 & 2 (U.S. only).

Whether you homeschool or not, Character Building for Families will help you instill Christlike character qualities in your children. It’s an excellent family devotions tool.

 

SALE DATES: nOW THRU mONDAY, 2-25-19

REG. $16.00 ea. SALE PRICE: $13.00 ea.

MORE INFO

 

God’s Wisdom and You (Part 2)

spiritual wisdomDaniel answered and said, “Blessed be the name of God forever and ever: for wisdom and might are His. He changes the times and the seasons; He removes kings, and sets up kings.

He gives wisdom to the wise and knowledge to those who know understanding; He reveals the deep and secret things. He knows what is in the darkness, and the light dwells with Him.

I thank You, and praise You, O God of my fathers, Who has given me wisdom and might, and has made known to me now what we desired of You….”
— Daniel 2:20-23

In our last post, we began looking at what this passage teaches us about living prophetically. We talked about God’s desire to transfer to us the wisdom and might He possesses. We also saw that God is the changer of times and seasons in our lives and how being aware of that helps us to flourish. Let’s continue.

He gives wisdom and understanding to those who already have it.

Remember the parable Jesus told of the ten pounds, in Luke 19:11-26? A rich man entrusted equal amounts of money to each of ten servants, intending that they would gain more through investing. They accomplished varying levels of increase, but one man did nothing with the money he had been given. He just hid it. His master was angry, and gave a surprising directive:

He said to those who stood by, “Take from him the pound, and give it to him who has ten pounds.”

The other servants objected, “Lord, he already has ten pounds!”  

The master answered, “I say to you, that to everyone who has shall be given; and he who has not, even what he has shall be taken away from him” (verses 24-26).

Things work a lot differently in God’s kingdom than we might expect. The Lord wants to give more to those who appreciate what He has already given them. If you are a child of God, you have an open offer of wisdom from Him. He promises it to us in many places in the Bible. If you value wisdom, you will seek Him for more — because we never have all we could have. He will gladly give it, for “… He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him” (Hebrews 11:6).

If you don’t value wisdom, you’ll be lackadaisical about seeking it — and your contentment to stay at your present level will hinder you from receiving all the wisdom and understanding God really desired for you to have (which is much more than you currently possess). We can never have too much wisdom, so go after the Lord for more. He’ll be happy to give it to you.

He reveals the deep and secret things to those who want to know.

This goes along with our previous point. God’s secrets aren’t reserved for a few hotshot prophets. He will share them with anyone who is serious about being His friend — whoever takes time to read His Word and ask Him about it; whoever inquires, “”What’s on Your heart, Lord? I want to know Your concerns. What do You want to talk about?” (and then listens for His response).

“… His secret is with the righteous.”Proverbs 3:32

“The secret of the LORD is with those who fear Him…”Psalm 25:14

You are righteous in Christ. You qualify to hear His secrets. He loves sharing them with you.

He knows what’s going on in darkness, and light dwells with Him.

In context, “He knows what is in the darkness, and the light dwells with Him” is continuing to speak of God drawing out the deep and secret things and revealing them to us. However, I see an additional application we can make.

Recently, I was upset about a wacky teaching an influential prophet was disseminating. (Praying for the American Church is a major focus of mine, so when I see error going on, it really bothers me.) But the Lord reminded me from Daniel 2:22 that He is very aware of what is going on, and I can leave it to Him. I don’t have to get worked up about the dark things. Instead, He wants me to fasten my attention on Him, to lift my eyes to where He is, in the light. In due time, He will take care of it, just as He says about the tares and wheat in Matthew 13:24-30. I can pray for the Church to be delivered from deception, but I should do it from the place of gazing on the Lord of light, not fuming about the stuff of darkness. It changed my perspective, for sure!

If we’re going to be overcomers in our tumultuous times, we must refuse to focus on the darkness around us, get our eyes on the Lord, and have confidence that He is on top of things.

Let’s sum up the lessons we can learn from Daniel 2:20-23:

1. Believe that the Lord delights to impart His wisdom and understanding to you. Seek Him for more of it.

2. Ask Him to share His deep secrets with you, because He wants to.

3. Don’t focus on the darkness. Instead, keep your eyes on Jesus, in the light.

4. When life seems to be shifting uncomfortably, remember that He is the One Who changes times and seasons. Stay close to Him, and move with Him.

By doing these things, we stay safe in His care while growing in His wisdom and knowledge.

prophetic teaching

 

Growing in the Prophetic,
Audio Teaching by Lee Ann Rubsam

 

 

 

prophetic gift

 

The Spirit-Filled Guide to Personal Prophecy,
by Lee Ann Rubsam

God’s Wisdom and You (Part 1)

spiritual wisdom Daniel answered and said, “Blessed be the name of God forever and ever: for wisdom and might are His. He changes the times and the seasons; He removes kings, and sets up kings.

He gives wisdom to the wise and knowledge to those who know understanding; He reveals the deep and secret things. He knows what is in the darkness, and the light dwells with Him.

I thank You, and praise You, O God of my fathers, Who has given me wisdom and might, and has made known to me now what we desired of You….”

— Daniel 2:20-23

Daniel was giving thanks to the Lord for revealing to him Nebuchadnezzar’s dream and its interpretation. Less familiar portions of the Bible can have gold nuggets hidden in them, and so it is here. There’s a lot of treasure for prophetic people in this short passage, so let’s take a look at what God has for us.

God desires to share His wisdom with us.

Daniel starts out by extolling God for His wisdom and might. He mentions that these two qualities belong to the Lord: they are His. He ends with thanking and praising the Lord, “Who has given me wisdom and might.”

Isn’t it amazing that the Lord of the whole universe delights to bestow on us what He possesses? Paul says in Romans 8:32, “He Who did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all, how shall He not with Him also freely give us all things?” He also stated, in 1 Corinthians 3:21, 22, “…All things are yours, whether … the world, or life, or death, or things present, or things to come; all are yours.” We so easily take the gifts of God for granted, but if we would think about them more deeply, our hearts would be inspired to overwhelming awe.

All true wisdom originates with the Lord. We cannot get it anywhere else. We should not even attempt to glean wisdom from so-called wise men who do not worship the true God, nor should we attempt to use their techniques for achieving peace or revelation. In Christ alone “are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Colossians 2:3). Furthermore, “Beware, so that no one spoils you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ: for in Him dwells all the fullness of the Godhead bodily” (Colossians 2:8, 9).

Now, the Holy Spirit might enlighten us to a portion of His wisdom through another person. He does that through sermons, godly counsel, and the word gifts mentioned in 1 Corinthians 12:8-10. We should also expect to receive wisdom directly from the Lord. But there is no other source of wisdom besides Him, and we get ourselves into a mess of deception if we go looking for it outside of Him. We can have confidence that, if we ask Him, He will be eager to give it, because He has already promised, “If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask of God, Who gives to all men liberally and does not upbraid [reproach], and it shall be given to him” (James 1:5).

God changes the times and seasons.

Whether it is what is going on in our personal lives, or in our nation and the world, we need to stay keenly aware that God has specific times and seasons for things. When His season is up, He moves on. We must stay attuned to Him, so that we don’t miss His shifts from one thing into another. When He is breathing life into something, it continues, increases, and thrives. But when He is done with it, it’s dead. You can enthusiastically kick that horse all you want, but without the Lord’s life in it, it’s not going anywhere.

Most of us like staying put in what is familiar. Change is disconcerting. Jesus commented on this tendency, when He likened the old and new covenants to wineskins. He said, “No man also having drunk old wine immediately desires new: for he says, ‘The old is better’” (Luke 5:39).

When upheaval is happening in our personal lives or in the nation or world, it is often because God is preparing a new thing. If we understand this, we will not let what we observe in the natural make us afraid. Keep your eyes on Jesus, Who does all things well (Mark 7:37), and be ready to move with Him — even quickly. There is blessing for the person who is open to the new works of God.

Lately I have been praying, “Lord, help me to recognize when You are shifting the seasons, give me Your understanding of how to respond, and help me to keep up with You!”

There are a few more lessons we can learn from Daniel 2:20-23. We’ll continue with them next time.

God’s Wisdom and You (Part 2) 

intercessor manual, intercessor handbook

 

 

The Intercessor Manual,
by Lee Ann Rubsam

 

prophetic teaching

 

 

Growing in the Prophetic,
audio set by Lee Ann Rubsam

Prophetic Eagles

prophetic eaglesLast time, we talked about attaining the “higher ground” of the Spirit.

Prophetic intercessors have often been compared to eagles, with good reason. Eagles habitually live in high places, with some preferring to nest on high cliffs. When on the hunt, their keen eyesight allows them to spot their prey up to three miles away. They have an entirely different view of the world than the ground-bound creatures do.

If we stay close to the Lord, “in the secret place of the Most High” (Psalm 91:1), like the eagle, we live in a safe place, above the fears and cares of earth. “For in the time of trouble, He shall hide me in His pavilion: in the secret of His tabernacle He shall hide me; He shall set me up upon a rock” (Psalm 27:5). We have confidence in the Lord, our Refuge and Protector. We know He has everything under control, even when it doesn’t look like it.

When we invest time in inquiring of the Lord about the difficulties we pray into, He gives us His aerial perspective — eagle-eye vision. In the spirit, we see things others cannot. Holy Spirit also sometimes gives us insider information about future events (seeing out ahead like the eagle), so that we can pray and prophetically declare into existence God’s plan in a given situation. “God … calls those things which are not as though they were” (Romans 4:17), and He invites us to do this with Him.

Seeing from our eagle perspective helps us recognize the spiritual war going on behind the perplexing events of earth. We keep in mind the truth of Ephesians 6:12: “We do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.”

Unfortunately, it is easy for prophetic intercessors to descend from our natural habitat on the heights and become earth-bound. This happens because, in one way or another, we get our eyes diverted from Jesus. We then find ourselves becoming heavily burdened by the things we see and hear with our natural senses. We lose our confidence in the Lord and start placing our trust in men or manmade things, such as the economy or political parties. We grow spiritually nearsighted, seeing only through the lens of what some “experts” say is happening or could happen. While eagles are by nature fearless, at this point we have become more like nervous chickens.

It takes vigilance to stay on higher ground (or to return there, if we have descended from it). I’ve noticed that Psalm 91:1 says we are to dwell in the secret place of the Most High — not just visit now and then.

Colossians 3:1-4 is part of the antidote to earth-bound thinking. It reminds us that the troubles of this present time are a mere blip on the radar screen of our glorious eternity:

“If you, then, are risen with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ sits on the right hand of God. Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth. For you are dead [to the temporal things of this world], and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When Christ, Who is our life, shall appear, then shall you also appear with Him in glory.”

The apostle Paul also commented, “For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us” (Romans 8:18). We need to continually remind ourselves that, very soon, eternity with Jesus will be ours. If we look forward expectantly to His return, hope flows in our hearts; we keep our higher ground perspective.

Let me leave you with this thought to ponder:
Which kind of Christian would you like to be? A chicken, who can’t see beyond the dirt of the earth it scratches in? Or an eagle, who soars in the realm of heaven, seeing from God’s viewpoint? Let’s fly higher.

prophetic training

 

Growing in the Prophetic,
Audio set by Lee Ann Rubsam

 

 

personal prophecy

 

The Spirit-Filled Guide to Personal Prophecy,
by Lee Ann Rubsam

 

Higher Ground

mesaIf you read at Out of the Fire on a regular basis, you know I often encourage intercessors to  wait on God for His perspective before launching into prayer.

A couple of weeks ago, we borrowed Higher Ground, a faith-based movie, from our library. We didn’t immediately watch it, but every time I passed that DVD case, those words, “higher ground,” caught my eye just a teeny bit. It didn’t really register, until I found myself humming the old Johnson Oatman, Jr. hymn by the same name. Finally the light dawned: “Aha! God is trying to speak to me!” (Side note: God often speaks to us in very small ways, but we miss His voice, because we’re just not paying attention.)

I hadn’t heard or sung Higher Ground in years, but once I understood God was drawing my attention to it, I looked up the words. They so aptly fit the concept of gaining God’s viewpoint. I have been meditating on the hymn since then, and I want to share it with you:

I’m pressing on the upward way,
New heights I’m gaining every day;
Still praying as I’m onward bound,
“Lord, plant my feet on higher ground.”

Refrain:
Lord, lift me up and let me stand,
By faith, on heaven’s tableland,
A higher plane than I have found;
Lord, plant my feet on higher ground.

My heart has no desire to stay
Where doubts arise and fears dismay;
Though some may dwell where those abound,
My prayer, my aim, is higher ground.

(Refrain)

I want to live above the world,
Though Satan’s darts at me are hurled;
For faith has caught the joyful sound,
The song of saints on higher ground.

(Refrain)

I want to scale the utmost height
And catch a gleam of glory bright;
But still I’ll pray till heav’n I’ve found,
“Lord, plant my feet on higher ground.”

(In case you’ve never heard this hymn, I’ve included a YouTube version of it at the end of this post.)

Higher Ground is the song of the overcomer. As the world around us becomes increasingly chaotic, we really must learn to live above it all. Ephesians 2:6 says God has “made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus.”

It’s also the song of the prophetic prayer warrior, concerning how we pray. We have a choice to make:

a.) Pray only from the natural realm perspective (as many habitually do), where “doubts arise and fears dismay,” praying from a position of fear, OR

b.) Go for the higher ground of God’s perspective, where we gain insight into what He wants to do in a given situation. Then, pray with confidence for His desired outcome.

Sometimes moving from the natural view to God’s view is a journey. We seek His face for what to think and how to pray, but getting His understanding doesn’t always happen rapidly. For me, it can be quite a lengthy process, but I keep inquiring, keep stepping forward in the little light I have. As I do that, more light shines.

During the period of time when I am still unsure how the Lord would have me tackle an issue, I pray a lot in tongues. As we pray in this way, the Holy Spirit releases wisdom about how to pray also with our understanding.

Like the song says, our aim is higher ground. We ascend the heights in incremental steps. But each time we ask Him for His perspective, we get a little more proficient in finding it. Over time, it becomes easier.

May I encourage you to go for the higher ground? It’s a powerful — and satisfying — place to pray from. When we do so, we are interceding in union with God, and that gets answers!

 

intercessor handbook

 

 

The Intercessor Manual,
by Lee Ann Rubsam

 

intercessor teaching

 

 

Your Intercession Questions Answered, by Lee Ann Rubsam

 

Holiday Recovery Still in Progress

Portrait of My Dog, by C. J. Mulloy, courtesy of Morguefile.com

I hope you had a lovely Christmas! My husband Paul and I are still recovering. We stuffed an extra seven people, two of them rambunctious preschoolers, into our small, two-bedroom house for nearly a week. Whew! Not used to that. And try cooking for that army, when you’re used to dinner for two!

Add in all the extra flurry of the holidays, closing out our business books for the year, a year-end birthday thrown into the mix, and — well, you understand.

I hope to get back into more frequent writing mode soon, but in the meantime, I would like to share a few thoughts with you.

Reflecting on this past year:

I have been so very grateful to the Lord for three big breakthroughs we received this past year — all of which had been bathed in a lot of prayer for several years before that. Two were healing of relationships, while the third involved placing my dear 89-year-old mom in a nursing home, where she is now safe and happy.

The mom breakthrough was actually a series of little miracles falling into place very quickly. All my cares about various obstacles and what-ifs fell, one by one, to the wayside. We watched as the Lord met every need at exactly the right moment and in the best way possible. It’s a long story, but suffice it to say that things turned out TONS better than I ever could have imagined.

I want to encourage you, if you need a breakthrough (or multiple breakthroughs), keep taking it to the Lord. Don’t give up, even if it’s been a long, hard road. He’s mindful of your every concern, and He is working it out behind the scenes for you, even though you can’t see it yet and you’ve been waiting a long time already. At the right moment, your answers will appear — better than what you prayed for. Express your cares to Him, and pray into every detail on your mind, because none of them are too small to catch His notice.

“Ask, and it shall be given to you … for everyone who asks receives” (Matthew 7:7, 8) is real. But sometimes we also have to follow through on, “Men ought always to pray, and not to faint” (Luke 18:1).

Oh, My Goodness!

“My Goodness” is one of God’s names (Psalm 144:2). It reveals His very nature. Lately, I’ve been focusing on Bible verses which talk about God’s goodness and His deep desire to bless us, because I want to get these concepts firmly rooted in my heart.

names of God, KJVWhile we would all theologically agree that God is good and that He wants to do good things for us, I suspect that most of us still struggle with being completely confident that He really will be good to us personally! The enemy loves to plant doubts in our minds about God’s excellent nature and His loving intent toward us. That deception has been going on since the Garden of Eden.

But the more we come to truly understand God’s nature — especially His goodness, mercy, and tender kindness toward us — the easier it becomes to trust Him through all things.

Here are the latest couple of verses I have been thinking on (but there are so many more to choose from):

Psalm 2:12“… Blessed are all those who put their trust in Him.”

Psalm 3:7“… Your blessing is upon your people.”

Pursue knowing Him above all else:

Intercessory prayer is indeed important. Amazingly, God has invited us to partner with Him in bringing His purposes into the earth through intercession. We should take this commission seriously. But as urgent as this is, pursuing Him with the express goal of knowing Him intimately is even more important to Him.

We must never become “Marthas” more than “Marys” — even when it comes to prayer. It’s easy to get caught up in focusing only on interceding when we see the desperate needs all around us. But Mary found the “one thing needful,” and Jesus said it was not to be taken away from her (Luke 10:38-42). So, don’t let either the internal pressure you feel to intercede, or pressure coming from other prayer warriors, keep you from devoting time simply to the Lord’s Presence.

Pursuing Jesus together with you in this new year,
~ Lee Ann

intercessor handbook

 

The Intercessor Manual,
by Lee Ann Rubsam

 

pray the Bible

 

The Intercessor’s Companion,
by Lee Ann Rubsam

 

Prophetic Intercession — Releasing Your Revelation

Hearing God speakIn our last post, we saw that God desires to share with us things yet to come. If you are an intercessor, the amount of time you spend with the Lord will most likely cause you to hear more about the future than believers who are not investing as much time in prayer. You are also more likely to hear about events which go beyond your personal life.

It has been said that, on average, intercessors hear two to three years ahead of schedule. Our advance notice can cause problems for us in the local church if we are not aware of this. Today, I’d like to help minimize those problems.

When we hear something from the Lord or experience a vision, it often feels like a “now” revelation because of its vivid intensity. The truth is, though, often it is not for the present. It is speaking of the future.

Typically, we excitedly contact our pastors with what we’ve heard or seen, especially if it’s to do with our local church. Meanwhile, pastors are often focused on the here and now: the day-to-day caring for their congregations, getting the next sermon together, short-term goals, and dealing with immediate problems. So, when we spring upon them an idea which doesn’t fit their current frame of reference, their response is, “That’s not God.” They may not tell us that, but it might be what they are thinking. The disparity between the “now” realm of our pastors and the “not yet” world of intercessors can create a tension-filled disconnect between the two groups. This is sad, because we have a lot to offer each other, if we could only learn to work together.

What can we intercessors do to help the situation? Here are some tips to make the road smoother:

Timing:

Wait on your word or vision for a few days before sharing it. Sometimes we release revelation too quickly, only to have God clarify and expand upon it, if we wait. Pray about whether this is the right time to share it. Proverbs 15:23 speaks to this: “A man has joy by the answer of his mouth, and a word spoken in due season, how good it is!”  A word released at the right moment is so much more effective than a word shared either prematurely or tardily.

Right before or after a church service is not usually a good time. Beforehand, your pastor is focused on guiding the service and preaching. Afterwards, he’s tired and just wants to be done.

Your presentation skills matter:

How you preface your word or vision has a lot to do with whether you will be heard. “The Lord told me you need to do this,” and “God said the church’s direction needs to change” rarely go over well, even if you really did hear from God. Such approaches are not only annoying, but they sound arrogant.

A softer approach is more likely to be received: “Pastor, I think I heard something from the Lord. This might not be for right now, but I wanted to mention it, in case it will be useful to you down the road somewhere.”

When possible, share your revelation in writing. Pastors are almost guaranteed to forget what you said if you only tell them orally. They have too many other things on their minds. Keep a copy of what you share, and date it.

Ask for feedback from your pastor, but then let it rest. Give your word or vision time to play out. When it finally does, it probably won’t look exactly like you envisioned it, but that’s OK.

If you see your word being fulfilled at a later date, rather than having a smug “I saw that coming!” attitude, look for an opportunity to encourage and bring confirmation. Sometimes my pastor or someone else in the church had the same prophetic revelation as mine a year or more afterward. I approached that by saying, “Pastor, I was excited to hear what was spoken this morning. You may not remember, but last September, I shared with you that same thing! It was an encouragement to me that we’re both hearing this.”

This is one reason why it is important to write down what you hear and see, with the date, so you can retell it accurately. If you approach this with a heart attitude of wanting to serve, you will not sound like you are bragging, and your reiterated word will truly encourage your pastor that he is on the right track.

Make sure you know what sphere God is speaking about before you share:

Much of what you hear will be for you personally, especially if it is of a corrective nature. Don’t mistakenly project it onto others. While growing in hearing the Lord, we sometimes err by thinking we have a word for the church, because we haven’t yet learned to distinguish between personal words and words for others. Ask God to make clear to you which it is before sharing.

While learning this, several times I shared revelation which I thought was for our congregation, but it wasn’t taken seriously. In my discouragement over not having my words received, I became confused about whether I could even hear God accurately. I nearly gave up. But at the critical moment, the Lord brought some prophetic words my way from two well-known ministers. They matched almost exactly several things I had heard. I then realized that what I had thought I was getting for the local church had been about the American church as a whole. No wonder they hadn’t made sense to my pastors!

If you make mistakes, don’t give up. Keep on listening to the Lord. Ask Him to help you mature in releasing your revelation. If you maintain a heart attitude of humility and desiring to serve, over time, God will honor your efforts, give you favor, and make a way for your words to be heard.

intercessor manual, intercessor handbook

 

The Intercessor Manual,
by Lee Ann Rubsam

 

questions about intercession

 

Your Intercession Questions Answered,
by Lee Ann Rubsam