Guidelines for Good Prophecy (Part 3)

Under the New Covenant in Christ, we don’t stone prophets who prophesy inaccurately (although sometimes I see harsh comments from people who would like to!). Instead, God has given us safeguard measures to be used within the Church to protect us from false or inaccurate prophecy.

He has now made the ability to prophesy available to all believers. “For you may all prophesy one by one, that all may learn, and all may be comforted” (1 Corinthians 14:31). A key phrase in that verse is, “that all may learn.” In making prophecy available to every believer, the Lord has also allowed for us to learn how to do it right over a period of time. Learning to hear God accurately is a process. So is learning to prophesy accurately.

Many of the modern-day prophets who are now known for getting their words right did not start out hitting the bullseye every time. They made mistakes. But they submitted themselves to mentors who patiently taught them, picked them up and dusted them off when they fell on their noses, and then sent them back out to try again. Thank God for shepherds like that!

Each of us who wish to prophesy must be willing to submit to a mentoring process as well. Not being open to learning from others indicates pride. Most of us start out prideful to some extent, but if we are ever to be a blessing to the body of Christ, we’re going to have to be teachable and let God refine us. God shaves away our pride through correction, making embarrassing mistakes, and bearing the brunt of criticism or ridicule, as well as other forms of painful refinement. God needs broken, crucified people to speak for Him. If we’re not broken, we end up speaking only for our own egos — and, spiritually speaking, that smells really bad.

Besides mentors, God guards the body of believers, as well as the person who prophesies, from inaccurate or even utterly false prophecy through allowing corporate discernment of whatever prophetic words are given. Discerning can be done by prophetic mentors and pastors, but others in the church may also fill the discerning role. Let’s look at a couple of verses which talk about this:

Let the prophets speak, two or three, and [then] let the others judge [discern; weigh].1 Corinthians 14:29

Do not despise prophesying. Prove [judge; discern; weigh] all things; hold fast that which is good.1 Thessalonians 5:20, 21

If we’re going to prophesy, we should already have done some weighing of what we’re about to say before we speak. But once it is said, it is out of our hands. Others in the church now have the responsibility to discern what we’ve spoken. We don’t exclusively judge our own words, because we are not a law unto ourselves. We are members of a body, and the other members assist us with their discernment — for the entire congregation’s protection as well as ours. This is really risky to our pride, but if the family of God is functioning properly, there will be grace given, and we will benefit in the long run.

What if the church family isn’t functioning well? Truthfully, this is the case a lot of the time. Too many prophetic people have ended up in the boneyard because of it. But God will use even the horrible experiences to shape us and bring us into a greater depth of accuracy in the prophetic, if we will lean into Him and let Him heal our hurts, rather than becoming angry and bitter.

If you can, find a group of Christians, whether a church congregation or a home fellowship group, where you feel safe in making mistakes as you learn. This may be a group which is in addition to your church family. If you don’t know of one, ask the Lord to lead you to one. He is very good at setting up circumstances so that we come in contact with the people we need in our lives.

And don’t give up on using the gifts which God has planted in you because of some bad experiences. God hasn’t given up on you. Besides, we’ve all had some pretty bad experiences. It goes with the territory of taking a risk and stepping out into the spiritual gifts.

Next time, I will give you some criteria I use in discerning all those prophecies we see out there on the Internet.

Previous — Part 2
Next — Things I Look for in a Prophet

Personal Prophecy

 

The Spirit-Filled Guide to Personal Prophecy

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2 responses to “Guidelines for Good Prophecy (Part 3)

  1. Lee Ann,
    Just a small comment from my point of view and experience. If a person can “not” find a mentor, a group of Christians, whether a church congregation or a home fellowship group… then supporting a prophetic voice is vital as well. Of course the prophetic voice must be balanced, the prophet is grounded in the Lord Jesus, grounded in the Word of God, and the anointing of the Holy Spirit flows in the various areas of the prophet’s life: family life, church life, etc.
    I perceive you can be placed in this category. Galatians 6:6 “Let him who is taught the word share in all good things with him who teaches.”
    Blessings!
    Costa

    Like

    • Thank you, Costa.

      One thing that came to mind as I read your comment was something James Goll, a well-known and accurate prophet, once said. He commented that most of the mentoring he had received through the years came through books. While I have had the opportunity to learn hands-on from a couple of wonderful pastors, I have also learned much from books and audio teaching. I looked at John Paul Jackson, who passed away a couple of years ago, as a dear mentor in the prophetic and in dream interpretation, although I never met him in person. Lynne Hammond and Wesley Duewel have taught me hugely about prayer. And Francis Frangipane is still another I have looked to for discipleship.

      So, as you have said, when we don’t have the opportunity to be mentored in person, we can still grow much through receiving counsel and teaching through the resources balanced men and women of God have put together.

      I pray that you will find ways to use the gifts God has given you in a local setting. I’m sure you have much to offer the Body and the Kingdom. May God connect you to people who need your ministry.

      Blessings, Lee Ann

      Like

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